Using the twenty-first chapter of the Gospel according to John, Kenneth Arnold offers a sustained reflection on the acquisition of patience, wisdom, and spiritual maturity. Utilizing his own love and experience of fishing, he teaches us “how to fish” and in doing so risk a transforming encounter with the Risen Lord.

Written in 3 extended Haibun (a Japanese literary form, mixing prose and haiku) an account of his fears and feelings surrounding his cancer; a post-treatment trip to Kyoto, Japan, where he is vibrantly alive in each moment; and a healing exploration of the sculpted stones in New York's Noguchi Museum and Garden.

Ken Arnold was recently featured on Palookamag.com

The summer we met we were dying / you of ALS and I of prostate cancer / We bonded over plans to kill ourselves / You were a talker after decades listening / to patients on your psychiatric couch...

City Lights Bookstore, almost November, hot as a day in August, / looking for Homage to the American Indians, a book of poems by Ernesto Cardenal / I published thirty-five years ago, now out of print, my last copy lost / in the zig-zag of my inconstant life, but the store has only his new books...

Her wheelbarrow overflows with cuttings / he’s just dolloped his tee with home-made / chocolate ice cream and on the horizon / the chickens are beginning to lay as she talks / about starting a family this perfect afternoon...



drops of rain bead / down the glass / how does one drop leave / such a long trail / the undiminished head / descending...





“Where are you? What are you doing?” / Not cellphone banter, she needs to know. / She thinks I’m lost. She’s been waiting. / “I’m at the corner of Walk and Don’t Walk.”





Vital Signs, full-length manuscript.
Through the Window's Dark, chapbook-length manuscript (long poem).
Her Seasons, Poems for Violet Dying.
This River of Stars, chapbook-length manuscript (poems out of the Portland Japanese Garden).